Problems at a gas station in Ljubljana: illegal migrants are becoming more and more presumptuous!

The incident happened at one of Petrol’s gas stations on Tržaška cesta in Ljubljana.

Meanwhile, these two migrants come to stand in line, right behind me. I could smell them – they were so close. I turn around and ask them to step back, to ensure safety distance. They take a step back. But then, the smaller one hisses something at me in Arabic,” a Slovenian citizen described her unpleasant experience with the illegal migrants at the Petrol gas station at Vič, Ljubljana. Petrol confirmed that a few cases of this did happen, which made the employees feel uncomfortable. “Of course, the employees do not engage in conflicts, as they have clear instructions on how to react. In the event of a major incident or threat, the employees have the option of using a panic button to call security or the police.”

Petrol customers have noticed that illegal migrants are gathering at the gas stations on Tržaška cesta, especially in the evenings, which is why one of the gas stations now has a security guard. One of the customers shared her negative experience on Facebook: “The cashier tells me that they have had problems with the migrants every night, but they still do not have a security guard,” her message read.

In her message, she also revealed that, according to the cashier, the problems with the illegal migrants occur on a daily basis at the Petrol gas stations at Vič and Dolgi most. Given that the asylum home is located in this part of Ljubljana, most of the problems could be caused by the residents of the asylum.

The outraged citizen warns that this is the new harsh reality of Slovenia and Europe
The described incident is just one of the many incidents that involve illegal immigrants. We have previously already reported about similar incidents. The author of the message, who shared the story of an anonymous Slovenian citizen with the public, is also aware of the fact that this will keep on happening. “This keeps happening more and more often. My intention is not to incite violence, but to draw attention to the events that will continue to happen even more regularly,” the author of the message warned.

Ljubljana Police Station’s response:
The Ljubljana Police Directorate has so far not been informed of the incident you are describing. In the area of the Ljubljana-Vič police station, we have dealt with two public order violations and two theft offences at gas stations this month, but none of the events were connected to migrants.

 In the municipality of Ljubljana, there has been no increase in crime occurrence at gas stations this year. Compared to last year, the number of crimes is about 10 percent lower (this year we have dealt with 341 cases by April, last year in the same time period, we have dealt with 382). We also want to point out that this is the data from all gas stations, and the police do not keep statistics on the nationality and religious beliefs of the individual offenders.

The police cooperate with all individuals, as well as legal entities, in providing the general security for people and property, and handling all events that we are notified of. Among other things, we advise the legal entities on preventive measures to protect their property in the best way possible and ensure the safety of people. We urge all citizens to immediately notify the police of any breach of public order or suspicion of criminal activity, by calling our telephone number 113.

You can read the entire message that was posted on Facebook below.

“AN EVENT THAT RECENTLY HAPPENED AT THE PETROL GAS STATION VIČ, LJUBLJANA, to a woman I know.

When I get to the station, the line is long. We are being let into the store individually, by an employee standing at the door. When it is my turn to go in, I notice two migrants who are walking around the store. I tell the cashier that they can finish up first, as they will surely get in line before me. She answers that they have been inside for a long time now. Okay. I get in line, and the couple in front of me remembers they forgot to buy their water. Meanwhile, these two migrants come to stand in line, right behind me. I could smell them – they were so close. I turn around and ask them to step back, to ensure safety distance. They take a step back. But then, the smaller one hisses something at me in Arabic. You don’t need to understand the language to know from his intonation that whatever he said was not kind. I hiss back to him in English and show them that they should step back even further. I’m trying to see where the employee that was standing by the door is, but she is not there. The smaller one seems to get braver, so I start cursing back at him in English. The cashier calls me to the cash register and tells me that they have had problems with the migrants every night, but they still do not have a security guard. I pay and leave. The smaller migrant continues shouting something in Arabic behind me. A man in front of the store asks me what is going on. I tell him. The three migrants that were waiting outside approach us. The man (150kg, his hands look like he could pull out a tree if he’d want to) says that it just so happens that today, he left his gun at home. The lady behind him raises her voice and starts asking where the security guard is. An employee shows up and asks what’s going on. The three migrants go away. The rest of the people in line start raising their voices – one is talking about law and order and how it should apply to everyone, the other one about security. The migrants come out of the store, and everyone starts giving them “friendly warnings” about how to behave in Slovenia. When a lady mentions that she could just call the police, the migrants quickly leave. I instantly feel better, as I know that these people only ever operate in packs, like hyenas.’

This keeps happening more and more often. I will not publish the author’s name.

IT IS TIME FOR US TO STAND TOGETHER AND TELL EVERYONE WHAT IS THE PROPER WAY TO BEHAVE IN SLOVENIA AND WHAT OUR CULTURE IS LIKE!

My intention is not to incite violence, but to draw attention to the events that will continue to happen even more regularly. This has also been happening in other European countries.”

Luka Perš